About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and moore, professor of law. the u.s. supreme court convened today behind closed doors discussing whether or not to review a lower court ruling striking down california's proposition 8. their highly anticipated decision could come monday. as you well know, the supreme court gets seven to eight thousand requests for cases to be reviewed. how do they decide? they only pick 80 or so a year. what is the criteria and why would prop 8 be an important one to look at? >> it's how legal the precedent is and how national the question is, how many people it affects, and relatedly, how much lower courts are struggling over that and related questions. so in the prop 8 case, it's true the prop 8 is a california-specific measure, and it's also true that a ninth circuit ruling tried to make its ruling non-specific. california is such an important state and it occurs in dozens of other states and that's why it might have some appeal for the supreme court. >> as you said, the ninth circuit narrowed it down, but when the court gets it, could they broaden it back up and make it a national ruling? >> indeed,
ranks led to the push for moore rigorous standards. nationwide only 35% of 8th graders met expectations in reading. and only 25% of high school graduates who took the a.c.t. college entrance exam testedded ready for college. the university of chicago's tim nolls says the poor outcome led to the call for new standards. >> one of the main motivations is looking at the highest performing countries in the world and the most improving countries in the world and saying, what are they doing? one of the things that we find that they're doing is they're teaching many fewer standards. in singapore, for example, which has some of the best mathematics and science results in the world they teach literally half the standards that america attempts to teach. >> reporter: the common core standards were developed by teachers, school administrators, experts and parents. but the developers say the federal government did not have a role in creating the standards. instead they were state-driven. each state must approve the standards if they are to be used. >> we're just going to read very, very short chapter
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)